Museo Interactivo Sobre Las Adicciones

Educating a youth audience

Specification:
Client: State of Sinaloa/Culiacan Local Govt
Service: Full Design Service
Size: 1450 sqm

Project Details



Culiacan is at the heart of Mexican narcotics country - it is the location of the chapel of the Narco Saint, Jesus Malderve, which is only a stones throw away from MET’s Museo Interactivo Sobre Las Adicciones.

It is with great determination and courage from the local community and others that this project became a reality, and it is with much admiration for the people of Culiacan and the Municipal Government that MET were proud to offer our design and research services to the community to help make this centre a reality.

We were first involved in discussions on the project when key stakeholders from the Mexican state visited our Drug Information Centre in HK and thought we were the right people for the project.


Ongoing research visits proved to be a spectacular insight into the very serious problems we had to tackle, with the Lancet commenting:

“Vices are endemic to the human condition and each of us has the potential to become an addict. Scare statements? Not at the Museo Interactivo Sobre Las Adicciones (aka MIA) in Culiacán, Mexico. MIA is a unique interactive games and exhibit-based addiction museum—narcotics feature, but so too do alcohol, tobacco, food, gambling, and Internet addictions. MIA broadcasts a strong message: addictions are pandemic and they are global.

The immersive and interactive MIA experience is intended to be a fun environment with a serious purpose - enjoyment but with real feedback. It's not overtly didactic but gives visitors experiences they can relate to.


MIA creatively confronts addiction by educating visitors through local stories and experiences. People don't choose addiction and healthy environments and educational support systems must be prioritized. Hopefully, the museum will play its part in this task by offering an experience that is fun, educational, and unforgettable.”

'MIA creatively confronts addiction by educating visitors through local stories an experiences. Immersive journeys take visitors through distorting addictive environments, which are initially fun and exciting but descends into darker experiences' (The Lancet - January 2012)

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Science
Welfare